Common Cancer in Children and treatment of that

When an adult gets cancer, its likely to begin in the lungs, breast, colon, prostate or skin. When a kid gets cancer, it can maintain the white blood cells or the nervous system, in the brain or bones, in the lymphatic system, muscles or kidneys. Below is a brief description of Common Cancer in Children and treatment of that.

Leukemia

Leukemias, which are cancers of the bone marrow and blood, would be the most common childhood cancers. They account for about 30% of all cancers in children. The most common types in children are acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

Combination chemotherapy, CNS prophylaxis: injecting chemotherapy into the cerebrospinal fluid (intrathecally) as a preventive measure against the leukemia propagating to the central nervous system, Radiation therapy to the head in selected cases, Allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation in first or second remission, according to the kind of leukemia, Investigational treatments

Brain Tumors
Brain tumors are the most common solid tumor in children. However, new research and clinical trials are leading to life saving innovations and raising survivorship daily.

Surgery to eliminate the tumor from the mind, Radiation therapy to the brain (and to the backbone, if the cancer is disseminated), Chemotherapy, Investigational treatments

Rhabdomyosarcoma

Rhabdomyosarcoma starts in cells that normally develop into skeletal muscles. (These are the muscles that we control to move parts of our body.) This form of cancer can begin virtually any location within the body, for example, head and neck, crotch, belly (abdomen), pelvis, or in an arm or leg. It may cause pain, swelling (a lump), or both.

Surgery to eliminate the tumor, Chemotherapy, Radiation therapy, High-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous bonemarrow transplantation (typically after relapse), Investigational treatments.

Osteosarcoma
Osteosarcoma is most common in teenagers, and usually grows in areas where the bone is growing rapidly, including near the ends of the long bones in the legs or arms. It often causes bone pain that gets worse at night or with action. It may also cause swelling in the region around the bone.
Preoperative chemotherapy, Limb-salvage operation, to maintain the limb, or amputation, Chemotherapy, Surgery to eliminate any metastatic tumors that stay following chemotherapy, Investigational treatments.
Ewing’s Sarcoma

Ewing sarcoma is a less common kind of bone cancer, which also can cause bone pain and swelling. It’s frequently found in young teenagers. The most typical locations for it to begin are the pelvic (hip) bones, the chest wall (such as the ribs or shoulder blades), or in the center of the long leg bones.
Preoperative chemotherapy, Surgery to eliminate the tumor, Radiation therapy (if the tumor isn’t completely resected), Surgery, to remove metastases to the lungs, High-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous bonemarrow transplantation (after relapse) Investigational treatments.

Hodgkin’s Disease

Chemotherapy, Radiation therapy, Investigational treatments

Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphomas

Chemotherapy, CNS prophylaxis: injecting chemotherapy into the cerebrospinal fluid (intrathecally) as a preventive measure against the lymphoma propagating to the central nervous system, Radiation therapy to the chest might be given to shrink a lymphoblastic lymphoma which is obstructing respiration or circulation, Allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation (after relapse), High-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous bonemarrow transplantation (typically after relapse), Investigational treatments